What methods are used in relative dating

21 Mar

Geologists generally know the age of a rock by determining the age of the group of rocks, or formation, that it is found in.

The age of formations is marked on a geologic calendar known as the geologic time scale.

Simply stated, each bed in a sequence of sedimentary rocks (or layered volcanic rocks) is younger than the bed below it and older than the bed above it.

This law follows two basic assumptions: (1) the beds were originally deposited near horizontal, and (2) the beds were not overturned after their deposition.

This is because new sediments are always laid down on top of sediments that have already been deposited.

For example, if an artefact, say an oil lamp, is found co-located on the same floor of a governor's dwelling, and that floor can be dated in archaeology terms by reason of the patterns employed in the mosaic, then it is assumed that in relation to the floor that the lamp is of the same age.

The Age of Dinosaurs was so many millions of years ago that it is very difficult to date exactly.

Scientists use two kinds of dating techniques to work out the age of rocks and fossils. This considers the positions of the different rocks in sequence (in relation to each other) and the different types of fossil that are found in them.

Absolute dating places events or rocks at a specific time.

If a geologist claims to be younger than his or her co-worker, that is a relative age.